Test Drive Our New Site! We have some improvements in the works that we're excited for you to experience. Click here to try our new, faster, mobile friendly beta site. We will be maintaining our current version of the site thru the end of 2024, so you can switch back as our improvements continue.
Legislation Quick Search
05/25/2024 12:39 PM
Pennsylvania House of Representatives
https://www.legis.state.pa.us/cfdocs/Legis/CSM/showMemoPublic.cfm?chamber=H&SPick=20130&cosponId=15003
Share:
Home / House Co-Sponsorship Memoranda

House Co-Sponsorship Memoranda

Subscribe to PaLegis Notifications
NEW!

Subscribe to receive notifications of new Co-Sponsorship Memos circulated

By Member | By Date | Keyword Search


House of Representatives
Session of 2013 - 2014 Regular Session

MEMORANDUM

Posted: July 14, 2014 09:45 AM
From: Representative Margo L. Davidson
To: All House members
Subject: Mental Health Reform Legislation - Four Bill Package
 
In the near future, I will introduce a legislation package comprised of recommendations to ensure individuals who suffer from a serious mental illness receive the treatment they need. I will be introducing a four-bill package that will implement legislative recommendations with an ultimate goal of improving the quality of life for individuals who have serious mental illnesses.

The first bill in the package amends Act 143 of July 9, 1976, known as the Mental Health Procedures Act, providing for Assisted Outpatient Treatment (AOT). AOT services could entail any of the following services: case management services, medication, periodic blood tests, individual or group therapy, day or partial programming activities, educational and vocational training and activities, alcohol or substance abuse treatment and counseling, supervision of living arrangements, and any other services within an individualized treatment plan.

The second bill in the package amends Act 258 of May 17, 1921, known as the Insurance Company Law, requiring insurance companies to provide health insurance coverage for Assisted Outpatient Treatment for serious mental illness.

The third bill in the package amends Act 143 of July 9, 1976, known as the Mental Health Procedures Act, to require facilities to notify an individual’s next of kin, including their spouse, parents, or children, in the event that their relative has been admitted to a mental health facility as a result of a mental health incident. The person’s next of kin must be an adult or an emancipated minor. It is important to note that notifying an individual’s next of kin does not violate the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) law. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights, an individual’s health information can be shared with a family member or friend in the individual’s absence, if the health care provider under their professional judgment, believes it is in the best interest of the individual.

The fourth bill would amend Act 153 of 2004, known as the Pennsylvania Amber Alert System, for the purpose of requiring the Pennsylvania State Police to operate the Missing Endangered Person Advisory System, just as they would the Amber Alert System, and requiring coordination with various state and federal authorities for the recovery of missing children and missing at-risk individuals. In addition, this proposal would further define an eligible missing individual under the Missing Endangered Person Advisory System as someone with a physical and mental impairment. This qualification will include, but will not be limited to, anyone diagnosed with a mental illness or cognitive impairment under Title 55 (Public Welfare), Chapter 5100 (Mental Health Procedures), of the Pennsylvania Code, and any disorder in accordance with the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual relating to autistic disorder, Rett’s disorder, dementia of the Alzheimer’s type, and schizophrenia.

Join me in co-sponsoring this important package of legislation that aids individuals within the Commonwealth who are in need of specialized treatment for their mental illnesses. In addition, families will benefit from this positive legislation which will assist in alleviating financial strain as it provides for insurance coverage for AOT. This package of legislation will assist individuals living with serious mental illnesses in our communities thrive and lead productive lifestyles despite their mental illnesses.

View Attachment


Document #1

Introduced as HB2513

Description: The first bill in the package amends Act 143 of July 9, 1976, known as the Mental Health Procedures Act, providing for Assisted Outpatient Treatment (AOT).  AOT services could entail any of the following services: case management services, medication, periodic blood tests, individual or group therapy, day or partial programming activities, educational and vocational training and activities, alcohol or substance abuse treatment and counseling, supervision of living arrangements, and any other services within an individualized treatment plan.
  View Attachment
 

Document #2

Introduced as HB2511

Description: The second bill in the package amends Act 258 of May 17, 1921, known as the Insurance Company Law, requiring insurance companies to provide health insurance coverage for Assisted Outpatient Treatment for serious mental illness. 
  View Attachment
 

Document #3

Introduced as HB2512

Description: The third bill in the package amends Act 143 of July 9, 1976, known as the Mental Health Procedures Act, to require facilities to notify an individual’s next of kin, including their spouse, parents, or children, in the event that their relative has been admitted to a mental health facility as a result of a mental health incident. 
  View Attachment
 

Document #4

Introduced as HB2514

Description: The fourth bill would amend Act 153 of 2004, known as the Pennsylvania Amber Alert System, for the purpose of requiring the Pennsylvania State Police to operate the Missing Endangered Person Advisory System, just as they would the Amber Alert System, and requiring coordination with various state and federal authorities for the recovery of missing children and missing at-risk individuals. 
  View Attachment